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Unfit in middle age: Are you doomed?

Mukul : risingbd.com
 
     
Publish on: 2018-06-14 4:54:14 PM     ||     Updated: 2018-06-15 2:52:00 PM

Risingbd Desk: Are you someone in middle age who keeps putting off that planned health kick for another day?

If so, a couple of new studies may give you a sense of urgency.

One paper found that elevated blood pressure in middle age increases the risk of dementia, while another says being frail at this time raises your chances of an early death.

So how bad is a lack of fitness in mid-life and is it condemning you to bad health in the future?

A study published in the European Heart Journal found those who were aged 50 with a systolic blood pressure of 130mmHg or above were nearly one-and-a-half times more likely to develop dementia than those with ideal blood pressure.

It's noteworthy that this is below the level of blood pressure considered to be high in the UK (140mmHg).

Researchers suggested a possible explanation for the link was that raised blood pressure could cause damage from "silent" or mini-strokes which can easily go un-noticed.

It's worth pointing out that the study of 8,639 people shows a link between elevated blood pressure at 50 and dementia but cannot prove cause and effect.
Researchers found no such association for people who were aged 60 or 70.

And any increase in risk needs to be seen in the context of your overall likelihood of getting dementia at some point in your life.

It is estimated that the risk of getting Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia, is one in 10 for men and one in five for women from the age of 45.

Nevertheless, Alzheimer's Research UK said it added to the evidence of a link between high blood pressure and dementia.

Frailty is known to be a health risk to people in later life because, among other things, it increases the likelihood of falls.

But a new paper, which examined data from 493,737 people involved in the UK Biobank study, found that being frail earlier in life also appeared to be a predictor of ill health and early death.

The study, published in the Lancet Public Health journal, defined frailty as anyone who had at least three of the following health problems:
•    Weight loss
•    Exhaustion
•    Weak grip strength
•    Low physical activity
•    Slow walking pace

 

But the million pound question is how do you get people to change their habits?
Prof Bellantuono said that for some, health warnings won't be enough.

Instead, finding an "internal motive that speaks to them" will be key to getting some people to exercise and be healthier.

"That could be picking up the grandchildren or going to watch the football," she adds.

But the million pound question is how do you get people to change their habits?
Prof Bellantuono said that for some, health warnings won't be enough.

Instead, finding an "internal motive that speaks to them" will be key to getting some people to exercise and be healthier.

"That could be picking up the grandchildren or going to watch the football," she adds.

Source: BBC


risingbd/June 14, 2018/Mukul